8-year mail delivery entertains Backus’ mother and daughter



“She has a routine where she creates her bookmarks with who it’s to whom and who it is and the sign,” said Sandra Savage, Sandoz’s daughter. “There’s a gospel quote on the front and she laminates each and cuts each one out. She finally started making family calendars. Every year it’s a special design and I have them every year.”

The gifts arrive like clockwork before Christmas, so on Monday, December 27, when a comb-bound calendar filled with personalized address labels arrived at Savage’s home, as expected. With one detail.

The calendar was for the wrong year.

Savage messaged his mother on Facebook.

“Is it important that you send me a 2014 calendar?” ” she wrote.

The fact that the schedule is for 2014 caused some confusion for both mother and daughter.

“We were trying to figure it out,” Savage said. “I was wondering if she was sending it to me to have everyone’s birthday whatever the year.”

Finally, the mystery is cleared up.

Savage realized that the address on the envelope was an old address in Fremont, California. The same address was printed on the address labels which Sandoz had also printed as a gift.

“I took out the envelope where it came from,” Savage said. “She sent it in on December 13 or 10. I looked and it said ‘2013’. So she was ahead of schedule.”

“I think what started was I asked him to look at the amount of money on the stamps, because I thought we could tell,” Sandoz said. “Then she found out that the postmark was in December 2013.”

That Savage received the gift is almost as baffling, because not only does Savage not live in Fremont, but she no longer lives in California. In 2014, she remarried and moved to a temporary home in Idaho pending construction of their permanent home, which they moved to after it was completed.

Not only did the 2014 calendar reach her after two moves, but also after a name change, because in 2013 her name was Sandra Lee.

“I don’t know how it got to us after all these addresses, especially without any transmission,” Savage said. “I’m shocked, because how did the post office find all these different addresses and finally land them in our forever home that we just custom built here in Nampa?” “

The package may be in limbo until Savage files a formal change of address for his current home, but that’s just a guess. Savage said she had received the personalized gifts every year since. She believes she didn’t notice the lack of a gift in 2013 as she was planning her wedding at the time.

Savage doesn’t remember knowingly having a lost letter in the mail, but she was glad it wasn’t something important she expected. The two women had fun once they got it all figured out.

“It’s great that it’s kind of a slice of the past to go back to 2014,” Savage said. “A lot of people have passed away since then, but I still have their birthdays to remember them.”

“It was fun,” Sandoz said. “I couldn’t figure it out. I thought maybe it was just a bookmark I picked up and mailed. I usually don’t have any left, but one thing after another, that didn’t seem right. I sure didn’t want her to think that I had lost my memory or anything. “

A representative of the U.S. Postal Service declined a request for an interview, but said these events where a letter appears several years later are rare.

“In most cases, these incidents do not involve mail that was lost in our network and found later,” wrote Desai Abdul-Razzaaq of USPS Corporate Communications. “What we usually find is that old letters and postcards – sometimes bought at flea markets, antique stores, and even online – are getting back into our system. The end result is what we do. better – as long as there is a deliverable address and the postage, card or letter is delivered. “

Travis Grimler is a writer for the weekly Pineandlakes Echo Journal in Pequot Lakes / Pine River. He can be reached at 218-855-5853 or [email protected]


Previous Utahraptor State Park To Open In 2023: Managers Still Tweaking Designs To Stay On Budget News
Next 6 Keto and Low Carb Meal Delivery Services